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Chicago & Illinois wasted $66 million for unused McCormick Place temp hospital

$66 million for fabric cubicles?
Chicago Sun-Times

It doesn’t matter if the temporary hospital was needed or not. Let’s give the government the benefit of the doubt that they were actually worried the hospital system in Chicago would be overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients. Let’s say they actually needed this facility that was capable of housing 2,750 patients. Instead of choosing a contractor that would charge taxpayers $66 million they could have gone with a contractor that would have charged NOTHING. That’s right… NOTHING!

McPier solicited proposals from three giants in construction: Walsh, Pepper Construction and Power Construction Company. And it hired Walsh even though Power said it either would forgo any fees or donate them to pandemic relief because it didn’t want to profit from the pandemic. Walsh charged $65.9 million, including more than $5.1 million in fees, records show.

Chicago Sun-Times

You can’t make this stuff up. A city and state that are both broke, that shutdown the state’s economy, and where lawmakers and union members received a raise this year opted to throw away $66 million on a temporary hospital that held exactly 38 patients!

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Thoughts

SARS-CoV-2 enters the lungs and attacks our blood vessels

Doctors and scientists are still struggling to figure out what is going on with this virus and why it is killing the people it’s killing. Symptoms are flu-like in the beginning, then pneumonia-like in the middle, but the end result seems to be that those symptoms are deceptive. The virus seems to be causing blood clots and attacking the vascular system.

Months into the pandemic, there is now a growing body of evidence to support the theory that the novel coronavirus can infect blood vessels, which could explain not only the high prevalence of blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks, but also provide an answer for the diverse set of head-to-toe symptoms that have emerged.

“All these Covid-associated complications were a mystery. We see blood clotting, we see kidney damage, we see inflammation of the heart, we see stroke, we see encephalitis [swelling of the brain],” says William Li, MD, president of the Angiogenesis Foundation. “A whole myriad of seemingly unconnected phenomena that you do not normally see with SARS or H1N1 or, frankly, most infectious diseases.”

“If you start to put all of the data together that’s emerging, it turns out that this virus is probably a vasculotropic virus, meaning that it affects the [blood vessels],” says Mandeep Mehra, MD, medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Heart and Vascular Center.

medium.com